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Re: Wet and Dry Aging Beef At Home

Posted By: gene miller
Date: Friday, January 30, 2004 at 12:36 p.m.

In Response To: Re: Wet and Dry Aging Beef At Home (Danny L)

I went to the site Danny L recommended and found the following link on that page under "Elsewhere on the web, meat science" It is written by the Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Missouri-Columbia and this is just an excerpt from it. The link to the whole article is below. It has a lot of good info on aging beef and sounds like you're right "kids do not try this at home!". The cost of a hospital stay, missed work, not to mention the cost of a whole rib eye or loin strip cannot outweigh the benifits of taking my beautiful wife out for a pleasent dinner at a fine chop house where the waiters, back waiters and water boys all fuss over us like we were king and queen. Besides if thier meat gets people sick we have someone to sue, but that gets into tort reform and thats another discussion. Thanks for the info, Gene.

Aging Environments

Temperature, relative humidity, air movement and general sanitation of the aging room are essential considerations in successfully aging beef. Temperature of the aging room should be maintained at approximately 34 to 36 degrees F, relative humidity at 85 to 90 percent and an air flow of 15 to 20 linear feet per minute at the surface of the product.
The aging room should be clean and free of all off-odors at all times. Floors and walls of the aging room should be thoroughly washed with an alkaline cleaning solution and an approved sanitizer applied weekly or more often if needed. Sawdust should not be used on the floors because it contributes to air contamination.

Cured and smoked meat, poultry, vegetables, fruits or shipping cartons should not be stored in the aging room because of the off-odor produced by such items, which will be adsorbed by the meat. Except during cleaning, walls, floors, and ceiling of the aging room should be kept as dry as possible.

Carcasses and wholesale cuts should be properly spaced on trolleys or hooks to allow complete circulation of air around the product.

Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Missouri-Columbia

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Messages In This Thread

Aging Beef At Home
Joe Ames -- Wednesday, October 1, 2003 at 8:48 p.m.
Re: Aging Beef At Home
Joe Thomspon -- Tuesday, November 18, 2003 at 6:41 a.m.
Why? (NT)
Joe Ames -- Tuesday, November 18, 2003 at 6:51 a.m.
Re: Aging Beef At Home
Mike Monaghan -- Sunday, November 23, 2003 at 1:57 p.m.
Thanks Mike. :-) (NT)
Joe Ames -- Sunday, November 23, 2003 at 3:37 p.m.
crispy Pizza
Carol Winn -- Monday, December 22, 2003 at 11:57 a.m.
Re: crispy Pizza
rosie -- Sunday, July 11, 2004 at 5:54 p.m.
Re: Aging Beef At Home
Ira -- Sunday, January 4, 2004 at 9:38 p.m.
Re: Aging Beef At Home
gene miller -- Friday, January 30, 2004 at 9:57 a.m.
Re: Wet and Dry Aging Beef At Home
Danny L -- Friday, January 30, 2004 at 12:05 p.m.
Re: Wet and Dry Aging Beef At Home
gene miller -- Friday, January 30, 2004 at 12:36 p.m.
Re: Wet and Dry Aging Beef At Home
Sam Haynes -- Wednesday, March 17, 2004 at 10:37 p.m.

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